Pokémon Go Augmented Reality Caught Us All: Here’s Why You Should Get Catching

Contributors: Maga Design Team Members
Graphic designed by: Afsaneh@magadesign.com

pokemon_go-v5The most talked-about, downloaded, acclaimed, and debated hit of the summer isn’t the latest Kardashian drama, but rather a mobile game reminiscent of years gone by, Pokémon GO. Due to the element of nostalgia, opportunity for exploration, and user connectivity, this app has created an explosive user base of fans (and skeptics) that will likely change the way we think about the future of gaming.

With the average gamer searching for Pokémon companions for roughly 45 minutes a day, the questions must be asked, “Why?” and “Who?”.  While the “why” is the most heavily debated part of this game, the “who” is actually the most interesting part of this 2016 application phenomenon.

Typically when a game (or similar artifact of mobile society) is released to the public, its adoption follows the typical life cycle bell-curve that we studied in our business and marketing classes. Innovators first, early adopters second, and the combo of early majority and late majority filling up the middle and end of the curve.

What this game did is make Augmented Reality technology, or AR, (which is still relatively “new” in terms of its mass consumption) easily digestible (i.e, fun and easy to use) for the larger percentage of the population. It did this by tapping into the ways we most commonly use our devices – GPS and our cameras, combined with a multigenerational franchise. Pokémon Go didn’t follow the typical curve, it seemed to explode all at once with all types of users adopting.

To note, Pokémon Go isn’t the first geocaching mobile game, nor is it possibly the best. Niantic, the developers of Pokémon Go, previously made another app known as Ingress. Not surprisingly, the gameplay for both apps are very similar, to the extent where much of the real-world data from Ingress has gotten pulled into Pokémon Go. In fact, Ingress could arguably be superior to Pokémon Go in terms of usability. In our opinion, Pokémon Go has considerable server issues and is rather limited in terms of what players can do. Much of this could be underpreparedness for the bandwidth needed for its release. Ingress also has been around for about three years and has undergone substantial gameplay tailoring.

Understanding “who”, we have to toss a nod to the favorite Pokémon cartoon characters like Pikachu. Now that the Pokémon franchise is roughly 20 years old, we find the average age of players are in their mid twenties to early thirties. These are the users who remember Pokémon from its early days when the first games were released for Nintendo’s Game Boy, and a card game and children’s show followed shortly after. We have an inherent desire to experience parts of our youth again, in just more relevant ways.

Of course there are younger and older people playing this game too, which takes us back to the massive impact this game has had on the user adoption process of gamification. If it was any other character-based game released (instead of using characters from a popular franchise), would the impact have been the same? Maybe. But, for now, only time will tell as the stage has been set for mass adoption of mobile AR gaming all in part to a little yellow-orangish creature.

But is the impact of Pokémon Go something that many are misinterpreting?

Some may give it a negative spin like it’s another distraction, but the core meaning of what this app has is truly something special. It’s creating an experience for people to go outside and play a truly social game, not social in the sense of over the internet (like Xbox Live and other services) or physically near each other. The placement of Pokémon in the real world has increased traffic to landmarks and cultural locations – resulting in positive and negative results.

The app tears AR away from its seemingly limited application to gaming and artificial intelligence, broadening it to entertainment, fitness, and possibly a lot more. Pokémon Go feels comparable to arcades of the past, only this time the arcade is everywhere. No doubt,  businesses will figure out how they can profit from leveraging in-game advertising and purchases to entice ‘trainers’ to their business.

While many naysayers are torn on the “why” people are out looking for Pokémon instead of, say, picking up litter, there’s something to be said about a game that unifies and bonds complete strangers across cultures and age brackets in public spaces. The Pokémon journey is a new frontier in convergence and is the start of bigger and better AR experiences to come.

Our 5 Favorite New York Times Visualizations

Given the many problems facing traditional publishing, old-fashioned newspapers like the New York Times have had to adapt to keep up. One way the NYT has done this is to experiment with stories online that change depending on viewer input, allowing readers to, in part, shape the stories they’re reading.

This has taken many forms, from simple infographics and data maps to complex human interest stories with videos and moving images that appear upon scrolling. Here are five of our favorites. Feel free to share yours in the comments!

1. Mapping Migration in the United States (image)

1This “Voronoi treemap” shows how many people living in a particular state were born there, following on from this interactive article showing population changes by state. And it does it in style, with eye-catching, colorful shapes depicting each percentage. As the article points out, one drawback is that the shapes don’t always match the percentages exactly, but overall, this kind of chart is a solid choice. It also lends itself well to certain kinds of financial data.

2. How the Recession Reshaped the Economy, in 255 Charts (see image here)

2255 is a big number, especially when it comes to charts. Nobody wants to sit through a presentation with 255 slides or graphs. But somehow, this visualization makes it work. Combining and overlaying graphs is not a new concept, but by overlapping so many lines in one image, overall patterns and trends emerge that might not have been visible on their own.

Combining so many graphs might be ill-advised in most situations, but careful overlapping keeps each line separate and visible. Additionally, scrolling causes overlays to appear that explain various trends in housing, healthcare, and other fields, highlighting related graphs. This puts each industry into context in a creative, visual, visceral way and drives the enormity of the economy home in a way that separate graphs might not.

3. Up Close on Baseball’s Borders (image)

3This fun visualization puts Facebook data to good use to settle a few perennial questions: where, exactly, does the line between Yankees fans and Red Sox fans lie? And how big are the disputed territories? By using an algorithm to smooth out data for how many people in a particular zip code “liked” a particular team on social media, this nifty little image was born, no doubt settling a few bets along the way.

4. In Georgia, Politics Moves Past Just Black and White (full article here)

4How do you map the changing face of a city? In this story, a simple population map comparing the demographics of Atlanta, Georgia in 1990 to its makeup in 2010 drives the image home. With simple interactivity highlighting particular counties, this visualization provides clear data, grounding a complex piece highlighting the new diversity in the Old South.

5. Norway, the Slow Way (read story)

5For something completely different, this human-interest travel piece on one person’s quest for the Midnight Sun uses video of the Norwegian coastline, excerpts from Norwegian TV programs, hand-drawn graphs illustrating relatively minor points, and charming animated maps to bring its story to life. Are they completely necessary? No. But they are delightful moments that change the pace of a long story, maintaining interest and inviting reflection.

In a story that is so much about pace and the visual details of Norway’s culture, these moving and interactive images contain more than a thousand words. They set the stage as well as dress it and guide us along the narrative in a way that words alone might not have accomplished. Scrolling almost seems too clunky a way to navigate the wonders of sea, sun, and land as it is presented here.

Data is often used to bolster arguments, clarify complex issues, or settle disagreements. Visualizations can be beautiful enough to be art. But used properly, data – in the form of graphs, maps, or images – can also tell a story, the bottom line that unites each of these articles.

How can you use interactive visualizations to tell your story in a more engaging way?

Slaying the Slideshow Dragon

We’ve all been there, shuffling into an early-morning meeting, hoping that this time, things will be different. The presenter will be engaging. The slides, compelling. The room, awake! And then… the dreaded bullet points appear, and the morning becomes a painful offering to the Slideshow Dragon.

Nobody wants meetings to be boring or presentations to fail. But even the most engaging presenter will find it difficult to reclaim the audience once their attention has been devoured by black-and-white text or slides that could have been emailed out.

But what exactly is wrong with traditional presentations? Do you have to use newer tools like Prezi to save the early-morning meeting? Let’s break it down with some basic design thinking.

Who are the end users?

In a presentation, the end users are the audience, whether they are colleagues, employees, or clients, and success can generally defined by whether they engage with and remember your quarterly report/new marketing pitch/project update.

Because people like connecting with other people, warm, engaging, enthusiastic presenters can do a lot of this work themselves, so why use visual aids at all? Unfortunately, most people remember only a small percentage of information they hear.

Organizing that information visually can increase retention considerably, as well as make the presentation more interesting—thus the allure of the Slidshow Dragon. But this is where many presentations go wrong and the dragon shows his ugly side.

Here Be Dragons

(Creative Commons)
Photo by Milos Milosevic (Creative Commons 2.0)

In order to communicate information, the presenter can use words (spoken or written), images, colors, media, and sounds. Problems tend to arise when those elements are out of balance. If a presenter is spending most of the time talking (i.e. it’s not a discussion or roundtable), then the words are already taken care of.

It may be tempting to highlight key words or phrases with bullet points, but the brain can only handle so many words at once—and most people would rather read than listen, especially if they think they’ll get the information faster.

Some people try to combine words with cool animations to help keep people engaged. Prezi is built on the idea that flying back and forth across a giant canvas and zooming in on important points is more visually interesting than flipping slides.

But visuals that are too interesting (or dizzying) can backfire, keeping the audience’s attention even more firmly planted on the screen, not the presenter. And if the visuals are that engaging, then they might be better off on their own with a voiceover and posted online, rather than upstaging (or consuming) a live presenter.

Define the Need

Photo by Jan Tik (Creative Commons)
Photo by Jan Tik (Creative Commons 2.0)

The answer is to use slides that aid the presentation visually. That means focusing on images, symbols, colors, and movement to support your message.

  • Convert words to images, symbols, or metaphors. Did something decrease? Use a picture of down arrow with the topic at hand and then talk about what happened. Is there a logical flow of information? Use a flow diagram. Make your information beautiful, or give people a memorable picture to latch onto. Only use words that can be integrated into the image).
  • Use the right tool for the job. Is the information you need to present spatially related (like a map, landscape, or 2D diagram)? Then Prezi might be your best choice. But if your information is hierarchical or linear (A à B à C), stick with something like PowerPoint or Keynote to avoid distracting or unnecessary movement.
  • Make any movement part of the message. If you’re flipping to a new slide, start a new thought. If you’re zooming in on an object, zoom in to the details of the topic. If you have a big, dramatic transition to a new image, transition to a new topic or thought as well.
  • Choose visuals you (or the audience) can interact with. Pick images that you can envision someone asking you to zoom in on or that change based on audience participation.
  • Keep it simple. People are there for your content, not a feature film. Choose simple, clear, relevant images, and don’t overdo them, or the Dragon of Excess Clip-Art may yet devour your masterpiece.
clip art dragon
Beware the clip-art dragon! Image by Clarissa Ridney (Creative Commons 2.0)

In the end, good presentations are like any other form of communication. They connect the speaker and listeners and result in the mutual sharing of information. They increase engagement and generate new ideas. Don’t be the Slideshow Dragon’s next victim—regardless of which presentation software you use!

Featured Photo by Richard Fisher (Creative Commons 2.0)

How to Host Frustration-Free Virtual Meetings

Meetings are not known for being the favorite pastime of the modern employee, even though everyone seems to be spending more time in them. But virtual meetings—now wildly popular thanks to telecommuting, globalization, and improving technology—have an even worse reputation.

If the video above feels familiar to you, you’re used to the frustrations of conference calls and communications platforms:

  • Tech that doesn’t work (or people that don’t know how to use it)
  • Boring, voice-only meetings that drag on and on, losing sight of the original goal
  • Off-topic rambling or inside jokes that only part of the team knows
  • Feeling ignored when you’re the only one not in the room—or the loudest one on the line
  • Lack of body language to gauge participants’ engagement and feelings

Virtual meetings do have some advantages, like reducing travel time and expenses as well as convenient document sharing, recording, and whiteboard features. It can also help unite teams that usually work in different geographical areas. But without some careful thought, the downsides can quickly destroy any potential gains.

Fixing the virtual meeting takes more than just getting everyone up to speed on the software. It requires a few simple, humanizing touches that help bring out the best in every member of the team. Remember, meetings need to help participants do their jobs better. So design the meeting around the job and the people, not the other way around.

Virtual Meeting Design Tips

In order to design human-centric virtual meetings, it’s important to ask these five questions:

  1. How can we make this meeting shorter?

Long meetings and virtual tech don’t go well together. It’s too easy for participants to multitask or lose the flow of the conversation. Once they’re no longer engaged, it’s even harder to generate good ideas and stay on track. If you need to have a six-hour brainstorming session, try to get everyone in the same room or break up the meeting into clearly-defined segments.

Better yet, try to figure out what’s taking the most time and consider ways to do some of that work outside the meeting. Can you post a project in a private workroom for people to comment on beforehand? Can presentations be uploaded centrally so people can view them ahead of time, allowing the meeting to focus on discussion? Could an emailed agenda take the place of some of the information-sharing?

  1. Is this meeting scheduled fairly?

If different timezones are involved, try to make sure that the burden of waking up early or staying late is shared by all participants. If someone is waking up in the middle of the night to join, respect their time and keep things on point. Listen to their input and offer to let them go as soon as possible—and then switch which team gets the awkward meeting time.

  1. What’s the goal?

Is there a clear agenda? Is everyone aware of it? Keep everyone on the same page with a central, organizing document shared multiple times before the event. Refer to it often so no one gets lost.

  1. Does the tech work? Can you control the audio?

Test equipment and send out meeting codes early and often. Try to equip your team with good headsets and mics as well as decent lighting if video is involved. Also, unmuted microphones are the bane of the virtual meeting. Find a platform that allows you to control the mic in case one of your team members forgets to mute theirs.

  1. Do you have a facilitator in palce?

Remember, not everyone knows good virtual meeting etiquette, like introducing yourself before you speak. Work with your team on good protocols and choose a facilitator who will make sure everyone is included. This person can call on others, either in order by name or by their area of expertise, to make sure everyone is sharing. The facilitator can also set aside time for silent brainstorming and get people back on track if the conversation wanders.

Make the People Matter

Most importantly, try to solicit a significant contribution from every team member. This humanizes the conversation and gives people a reason to be invested. Remember that all those phone numbers, screen names, or camera boxes represent real people. Design your meeting around those people, and your virtual meeting can become the center of connection and innovation instead of a dreaded chore.

What 5 famous logos teach us about design

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. But these five images are worth millions… of dollars.

In today’s crowded digital and physical marketplace, a strong logo is like a brand’s signature—it’s a key way to set a company apart or identify a brand. But designing one that “feels right” can be a challenge, as even Google found out back in September when designers and consumers showed up to criticize its visual updates.

But some logos stand the test of time and form a unique part of a company’s history. A few factors can make all the difference, as illustrated by these five well-known logos.

  1. Personality: Coca-Cola

From ice-skating polar bears to hippies singing in a field, Coca-Cola has a very clear personality. Although it’s done much to update its brand with hip stars and upbeat associations, it remains a classic. And that’s exactly what this scripted “wordmark” evokes. It’s not formal or stuffy, but it makes you think of wholesome soda shops and 50s-era nostalgia, even though its iconic logo was designed all the way back in 1887.

  1. Symbolism: Microsoft

In 2012, Microsoft capitalized on its most recognizable product for its new logo design. The new logo modified the previous lettering and added the iconic colored squares.

The new symbol is colorful and easily recognizable as an avatar on small screens, a key factor in modern logo design. Symbols and words must be visible and identifiable regardless of the screen they’re viewed on, whether it’s a 72-inch high-definition television or a 4-inch phone screen.

Now that many companies use their logo as an avatar on social media, it’s even more important to have clear, seamless designs that are instantly recognizable—perhaps part of the motive behind Google’s sans-serif shift.

  1. Simplicity: Apple.

Apple_2003_logoOver the years, Apple’s logo changed from the rainbow-hued apple of the 80s to a much simpler image as the company’s brand became more streamlined. The symbol reflects the name, not the product, but it’s easily identified (the reason a bite was taken out of the apple was to differentiate the image from a cherry) and makes you think of the company’s name using a symbol alone.

  1. Competition: Ford

Part of the purpose of a logo is to differentiate a brand from its competitors. Ford does this by appealing to the same classic ethos Coca-Cola does. Where many of its competitors have gone the symbolic or single-letter route, Ford differentiates itself every time the logo is printed and conjures up images of tradition, stability, and quality. The icon is also in the shape of an oval to accommodate the “Ford” name, which differentiates it from the round logos of car companies like BMW and Volkswagon.

  1. Patience: Nike

200px-Logo_NIKESometimes, it simply takes time for a logo to take hold. When Nike’s logo was designed for $35 by a design student named Carolyn Davidson in 1971, the company’s founder was ambivalent. Today, it’s one of the most recognizable symbols in the world. The company even removed its name, preferring to let the “swoosh” speak for itself.

Of course, it helps that it was well designed. The swoosh implies motion, which makes it perfect for a sports-shoe company, and it is simple enough to almost have predicted the modern preference for unfussy branding. Sometimes, it just takes a little time for good design to be recognized—and with time, a mark comes to be accepted. Try to design for the long term and not jump ship when the next trend comes along.

If these logos tell us anything, it’s that good design can weather changes in pop culture, design trends, and even technology. Will yours make the list?