What We’re Reading

In addition to the surplus of whiteboard surfaces, reading nooks, call rooms and festive decor (alright, maybe we love everything), one of the most popular features in the new Maga studio space is our library.  The incorporation of design, creative process, business and sociology literature has become an integral source of inspiration for the Maga crew. We’re fortunate that there is no shortage of thoughtful, design minded texts and we look forward to sharing our favorites with you!

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Valentine’s Day Visualizations

On this special chocolate-and-sappy-greeting-card filled day, we thought it would be fun to share a few of our favorite Valentine’s Day infographics and visualizations. February 14th continues to generate a significant amount of graphics — illustrating anything from how to avoid bad dates, popular Valentine’s travel destinations, spending trends, the history of certain customs and so much more.

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Maps for the Modern Age

Finding out a fact or figure used to be a tedious process, before Wikipedia came along. The flagship platform of the Wikimedia Foundation, Wikipedia revolutionized the way we conceive of an encyclopedia. Launched in 2001, it was an attempt to crowd-source the world’s knowledge: anyone could contribute, anyone could edit. Though this has resulted in a fair share of blunders over the years, Wikipedia has been a resounding success, with a searchable repository of 24 million articles in over 250 languages.

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Maga + Design Thinking DC

Our DC studio recently became big fans of the experience innovation and business collaboration meet up group, Design Thinking DC. This past Wednesday, Chris, Olivia and I attended their event in the creative web design agency, ncluds‘ awesome space downtown.

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Infographic Evolution

Telling literal stories and conveying information through visual representations has been going on for millennia. Cave paintings in places like Spain and France that date back tens of thousands of years were some of the first examples. At that point, using drawings to convey a story was not a luxury, but instead a necessity in societies that had not yet developed written language. To other civilizations like the ancient Egyptians, these visual pictographs became the written language, and coated the walls of their tombs and temples.

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