Why Learning Centric Instruction is the Future of Training

By: Jordan Orzolek

Very few announcements induce a sense of irritation in employees more than that of mandatory training. Who can blame them? This means that they will soon be subjected to hours of lecturing by a speaker who repeats things already known, ventures into irrelevant topics, or drones on while the learners are watching the clock, eager to leave. This seems inevitable but truthfully, it isn’t. Through a system I refer to as Learner Centric Instruction (LCI), I believe that this common behavior can be averted and replaced with a more palatable experience.

In this system, e-learning (computer-based instruction) takes precedence over traditional instructor-led learning experiences. The focus on e-learning allows for the learning experience to be controlled and delivered uniformly, thus eliminating the variance that instructor-led training is often subject to (though it is not to say that instructor led training would be eliminated entirely – it simply would be used for circumstances that specifically require it). In LCI, the learning is broken up into convenient micro-modules that cover specific content, and is paced appropriately for the target audience. These micro-modules would be short (5-10 minutes) with more complex subjects broken up into multiple modules. This may seem like too little time for a topic to be appropriately covered, but it is necessary given that the average human attention span is a mere 8 seconds. The allotted time for the micro-modules allows them to be taken at the learner’s convenience.

How does LCI become a fun experience? It comes down to the way in which the content is presented. Humans have a natural affinity for stories (especially well-written ones). Through engaging stories and scenarios, the learner can envision the content in context. The media of LCI is fast-paced and engaging, with content presented in a manner that allows the learner to have a multi-sensory experience. The screen is not over crowded with massive blocks of text; instead, voiceovers narrate the content in a casual, engaging manner. In compliance with 508 requirements, a complete transcript of the narration is also available to the learners.

What about the experience surrounding LCI? In order for LCI to be effective, it must be easily accessible. If the learning experiences are not easily accessible, the learner’s interest will be lost before they even reach the content. This requires the use of a quality Learning Management System (LMS) as a convenient portal for learners to access the content in a single location. The completion of a micro-module would be automatically logged into the LMS and viewable to administrators.

LCI presents a “win-win” situation: employers can train their employees in an effective manner and reach company goals, and employees can receive training in subjects areas of interest to them and find it exciting and engaging in the process.

Visualizing the Outcome Means Seeing the Steps Along the Way by Sheldon Reiffenstein and Elizabeth Pfeifer

We have been taught over the past decade or so to visualize our goals. Teachers are told to plan their lessons with the end (the assessment of learning) in mind; doctors devise treatment plans consisting of various components to cure a patient; and athletes are coached to visualize the race in their heads before exiting the gate. Making it to the end,however, isn’t just about seeing a smiling student waving an “A+” test, a cancer patient sobbing with joy at being told they are in remission, or a skier crossing the finish line. Visualization also consists of being able to see – and thus plan for – the steps involved in the process.

The New York Times recently ran a terrific series of graphics involving Olympic Slalom gold medalist Mikaela Shiffrin’s winning run. The graphic is composed of a series of pictures taken yard-by-yard just as she had trained to see it. This type of visualization has been called small multiples by Edward Tufte, who has been called the world’s leading analyst of visual information. Small multiples, says Tufte, “visually enforce comparisons of change,” allowing for uninterrupted visual reasoning.∗  Notice, at one point how Shiffrin almost loses control, falls back on her skis for the slightest moment, but recovers to win the gold medal. Small multiples are just one way to visualize the steps to success.

Business journeys rarely run completely smoothly. Almost inevitably, a business will “fall back on its skis” as some problem occurs that has the potential to knock it off course. But, like the teacher, the doctor and the athlete who have planned their course, when a customer can harness the power of the visualization process, they have the ability to readjust and, using their visual map of steps to successful outcome, they can recover and achieve their goal.

 

Tufte, E. (1990). Envisioning Information. (p. 67). Cheshire, CT: Graphics Press LLC.

 

 

 

Visualizing the World’s Internet Usage – Illegally

It seems like a paradox that a hacker would bother monitoring approximately half a million connected devices around the world out of sheer curiosity. But, there it is, the undeniable truth that a hacker recently measured 24 hours of internet access, producing a color coded, animated GIF to distinguish between higher and lower usage… just because.

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Scott explains: What is it about maps and their superpowers?

Last week Maga’s CEO, Scott Williams authored a piece featured in Innovation Excellence’s blog, explaining the extent to which maps have and always will hold a certain type of superpower — the ability to overcome complexity.

Continue reading Scott explains: What is it about maps and their superpowers?